Re: [MOL] : Computers//Good articile /More info.Chris. [01299] Medicine On Line


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Re: [MOL] : Computers//Good articile /More info.Chris.



Tonight's news had a new test that was interesting, a very thin probe with 6
feelers the size of a hair and this info. is fed to a computer also.  It is
more comfortable than a Mammogram.  The thing that struck me the most was:
THAT 75% OF BREAST CANCER said to be found was not breast cancer. I have
been seeing things on the internet about false/positive reports, unnecessary
surgery; but not a stats.  Boy could that be right?  That one knocked the
socks off of me and then I remember that I had seen my pathology report.
Whew! Always, lillian


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www.angelfire.com/sc/molangels/index.html

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more....

----- Original Message -----
From: <CCR417@aol.com>
To: <mol-cancer@lists.meds.com>
Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2000 3:53 PM
Subject: [MOL] Study: Computers Help Detect Cancer


>
> Study: Computers Help Detect Cancer
>
> By LINDSEY TANNER
> .c The Associated Press
>
>
> CHICAGO (AP) - Using computers to double-check mammograms can increase the
> detection of cancers by 20 percent, according to a study that supports
early
> predictions for the new technology.
>
> The findings based on mammograms given to nearly 13,000 women suggest the
> technology can help radiologists find breast cancers earlier while
improving
> their accuracy. Radiologists miss about one in five breast cancers.
>
> ``The reason is because the signs can be so extremely subtle,'' said Dr.
> Timothy W. Freer, who presented his findings Tuesday at the Radiology
Society
> of North America's annual meeting. ``Computer-assisted detection helps us
> recognize those signs, such as minute calcium deposits, or very subtle
masses
> or changes in architecture.''
>
> The $200,000 ImageChecker system used in the study was approved by the
Food
> and Drug Administration two years ago based on preliminary research
showing
> success rates similar to Freer's. It is the only such technology with that
> approval.
>
> The system works with the regular X-ray image taken in a mammogram. The
film
> is run through a computer processor that creates a digital image. The
> computer, ``trained to recognize certain subtle patterns,'' scans the
image
> and marks suspicious-looking areas, Freer said.
>
> ``That invites us to take a closer look,'' he said.
>
> In the study of 12,860 women screened at the Women's Diagnostic & Breast
> Health Center in Plano, 49 unsuspected cancers were detected, including
eight
> picked up by ImageChecker that the radiologist had missed. All eight were
in
> very early stages, when they are most easily treated.
>
> ``Computers don't get tired like people do,'' said Dr. Stephen Feig,
> professor of radiology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York.
>
> ``Still, it's going to be up to a radiologist to decide whether something
> found by a computer needs to be biopsied,'' said Feig, who was not
involved
> in the research.
>
> The number of women asked to return to the radiologist for more tests and
the
> biopsy rates also increased by 20 percent in Freer's study. Though some of
> those were false alarms, the increases were proportional to the increases
in
> cancer detection and were thus considered acceptable, said Freer, director
of
> the Plano center.
>
> More research is needed before such computer-assisted methods can be
> recommended as a routine screening tool, Feig said.
>
> Only about 150 units are used worldwide, Freer said. But even if other
> studies find similar results, cost likely will impede widespread use of
> computer-assisted detection.
>
> Mammograms typically cost between $75 and $150. At large centers,
> computer-assisted detection could add as little as $15 to the tab. But at
> smaller centers, costs could be substantially more, Freer said.
>
> ``It might be more encouraging for people to practice mammography if they
> know they can be more accurate in reading a very difficult exam,'' he
said.
>
> On the Net:
>
> National Cancer Institute: http://cis.nci.nih.gov/fact/5-28.htm
>
> American Cancer Society: http://www.cancer.org
>
> AP-NY-11-28-00 1031EST
>
> Copyright 2000 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP
news
> report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed
> without the prior written authority of The Associated Press.  All active
> hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.
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