RE: [MOL] FDA cracks down on laetrile resurgence [00511] Medicine On Line


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RE: [MOL] FDA cracks down on laetrile resurgence



Please see the nci on the various aspects on laetrile, b17, and Laetrile.
The fda crackdown comes about based on the labeling and the claims.
The sale of apricot seeds is still strong with many believing it can work
for them.
The cyanide within the apricot seed is also in 1700 hundred different
plants, so don't be in fear.
Work continues with people still being cured, that is their choice, western
medicine or laetrile.
I am amused that the fda is warning us not to take drugs that are not safe
and effective.  John Taylor should be looking at chemotherapy?
John should also look at aspirin.  That kills 6,000 people a year.  Is the
fda protecting us form aspirin?  Laetrile doesn't kill, if anything it gives
hope.
The hype about everything but what counts.





 -----Original Message-----
From: 	owner-mol-cancer@lists.meds.com
[mailto:owner-mol-cancer@lists.meds.com]  On Behalf Of Joicy
Sent:	Friday, September 08, 2000 4:08 PM
To:	MOL.mol-cancer@lists.meds.com
Subject:	[MOL] FDA cracks down on laetrile resurgence

FDA cracks down on laetrile resurgence
    [09/07/2000; Cable News Network]

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Federal health officials warned Internet users
Wednesday to beware of a concoction made of apricot seeds that's
touted as a cancer cure, as a Florida court case became the government's
latest attempt to quell a resurgence of laetrile.

In the 1970s, thousands of patients went to Mexico seeking laetrile,
and some doctors sold it in the United States, before a National
Cancer Institute study concluded the substance did not fight
cancer. Experts also warned that laetrile pills could cause cyanide
poisoning.

So the Food and Drug Administration declared laetrile illegal.
Several states fought the FDA action but courts backed the government,
ending laetrile's heyday by 1980.

Now laetrile is rebounding on the Internet, sometimes sold under
the aliases amygdalin or "vitamin B17."

Wednesday, the FDA announced that a U.S. District judge in Miami
had issued a preliminary injunction halting sales by three Internet
sites, and warned consumers to beware.

"We do not want people to take products that have not been proven
to be safe and effective," said FDA enforcement chief John Taylor,
saying the biggest worry is that patients will forego proven
cancer therapy.

The full article can be found at:

http://www.cnn.com/2000/HEALTH/cancer/09/07/laetrile.crackdown.ap/index.html

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