[MOL] Bile Duct Cancer/Bridget and Brenda [00307] Medicine On Line


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[MOL] Bile Duct Cancer/Bridget and Brenda



Bile Duct Cancer can be a primary and if caught in a early stage this is
great.  Here is what they say at the NCI on Bile Duct Cancer and its
treatments.    The chemo 5FU has been around for many year's however they
have found that is is less effective than most chemo's.  Yet this same drug
used with one or two more chemo's becomes highly effective.  I believe this
will answer some of the questions you have....Warmly, lillian

TREATMENT OPTION OVERVIEW
How extrahepatic bile duct cancer is treated
There are treatments for all patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer.
Two kinds of treatment are used:
surgery (taking out the cancer or taking steps to relieve symptoms caused by
the cancer)

radiation therapy (using high-dose x-rays to kill cancer cells)

Other treatments for extrahepatic bile duct cancer are being studied in
clinical trials. These include:
chemotherapy (using drugs to kill cancer cells)
biological therapy (using the body's immune system to fight cancer)

Surgery is a common treatment of extrahepatic bile duct cancer. If the
cancer is small and is only in the bile duct, a doctor may remove the whole
bile duct and make a new duct by connecting the duct openings in the liver
to the intestine. The doctor will also remove lymph nodes and look at them
under the microscope to see if they contain cancer. If the cancer has spread
outside the bile duct, a surgeon may remove the bile duct and the tissues
around it.
If the cancer has spread and it cannot be removed, the doctor may do surgery
to relieve symptoms. If the cancer is blocking the small intestine and bile
builds up in the gallbladder, the doctor may do surgery to go around
(bypass) all or part of the small intestine. During this operation, the
doctor will cut the gallbladder or bile duct and sew it to the small
intestine. This is called biliary bypass. Surgery or x-ray procedures may
also be done to put in a tube (catheter) to drain bile that has built up in
the area. During these procedures, the doctor may make the catheter drain
through a tube to the outside of the body or the catheter may go around the
blocked area and drain the bile to the small intestine. In addition, if the
cancer is blocking the flow of food from the stomach, the stomach may be
sewn directly to the small intestine so the patient can continue to eat
normally.

Radiation therapy is the use of high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and
shrink tumors. Radiation may come from a machine outside the body (external-
beam radiation therapy) or from putting materials that produce radiation
(radioisotopes) through thin plastic tubes into the area where the cancer
cells are found (internal radiation therapy).

Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy may be
taken by pill, or it may be put into the body by inserting a needle into a
vein or muscle. Chemotherapy is called a systemic treatment because the drug
enters the bloodstream, travels through the body, and can kill cancer cells
outside the bile duct.

Biological therapy tries to get the body to fight cancer. It uses materials
made by the body or made in a laboratory to boost, direct, or restore the
body's natural defenses against disease. Biological therapy is sometimes
called biological response modifier (BRM) therapy or immunotherapy. This
treatment is currently only being given in clinical trials.


Treatment by stage
Treatment depends on the stage of the disease, and the patient's age and
overall health.
Standard treatment may be considered because of its effectiveness in
patients in past studies, or participation in a clinical trial may be
considered. Not all patients are cured with standard therapy and some
standard treatments may have more side effects than are desired. For these
reasons, clinical trials are designed to find better ways to treat cancer
patients and are based on the most up-to-date information. Clinical trials
are ongoing in some parts of the country for patients with extrahepatic bile
duct cancer. To learn more about clinical trials, call the Cancer
Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237); TTY at
1-800-332-8615.



----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

LOCALIZED EXTRAHEPATIC BILE DUCT CANCER
Treatment may be one of the following:

1. Surgery to remove the cancer.
2. Surgery to remove the cancer followed by external-beam radiation therapy.



----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

UNRESECTABLE EXTRAHEPATIC BILE DUCT CANCER
Treatment may be one of the following:

1. Surgery or other procedures to bypass blockage in the bile duct.
2. Surgery or other procedures to bypass blockage in the bile duct followed
by external-beam radiation therapy or internal radiation therapy.
3. Clinical trials of radiation therapy with drugs to make the cancer cells
more sensitive to radiation (radiosensitizers).
4. Clinical trials of chemotherapy or biological therapy.



----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

RECURRENT EXTRAHEPATIC BILE DUCT CANCER
Treatment depends on many factors, including where the cancer came back and
what treatment the patient received before. Clinical trials are testing new
treatments.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

TO LEARN MORE
For more information, call the National Cancer Institute's Cancer
Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237); TTY at
1-800-332-8615. The call is free and a trained information specialist is
available to answer your questions.
The National Cancer Institute has booklets and other materials for patients,
health professionals, and the public. These publications discuss types of
cancer, methods of cancer treatment, coping with cancer, and clinical
trials. Some publications provide information on tests for cancer, cancer
causes and prevention, cancer statistics, and NCI research activities. NCI
materials on these and other topics may be ordered online from the NCI
Publications Locator Service at Http: //publications.nci.nih.gov or by
telephone from the Cancer Information Service toll free at 1-800-4-CANCER.

There are many other places where people can get materials and information
about cancer treatment and services. Local hospitals may have information on
local and regional agencies that offer information about finances, getting
to and from treatment, receiving care at home, and dealing with problems
associated with cancer treatment. A list of organizations and websites that
offer information and services for cancer patients and their families is
available on CancerNet at Http: //cancernet.nci.nih.gov/cancerlinks.html.

For more information from the National Cancer Institute, please write to
this address:


National Cancer Institute
Office of Cancer Communications
31 Center Drive, MSC 2580
Bethesda, MD 20892-2580



We invite you to take a look at our Album.
www.angelfire.com/sc/molangels/index.html

  ( Very informational, good tips, Molers pictures, art work and much
more....

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bridget Rambeau" <bsbridget@hotmail.com>
To: <mol-cancer@lists.meds.com>
Sent: Wednesday, September 06, 2000 5:45 AM
Subject: Re: [MOL] clinical trials, etc.


> Hi guys. I've never heard of bile duct cancer being referred to as primary
> liver cancer and was wondering where you got that information.
> Yes I did have the surgery in Aug.'98.
> Almost all sources I researched indicated radiation as an effective
adjuvent
> treatment. As far as the chemo, the way my doctor described it to me was
> that it was intended to kill any stray cancer cells that may have drifted
to
> an area outside the primary site where the radiation was being done.
Because
> the drug (fu5) and the dosage were fairly mild with minimal side effects,
I
> decided better safe than sorry. One of the problems is the lack of many
> clinical trials as it is such a rare form of cancer. So a lot of what they
> don't know is because it's never been tested in trials.
> Now it's my turn. May I ask a question of you that's somewhat unrelated.
> Following the surgery and up to this point, was pain (chronic) ever a
> problem? Thanks.
> Hope this helps some, I know how hard these decisions are to make.
> Your friend,
> Bridget
>
>
> >From: Brenda Anderson <banderson0511@yahoo.com>
> >Reply-To: mol-cancer@lists.meds.com
> >To: mol-cancer@lists.meds.com
> >Subject: [MOL] clinical trials, etc.
> >Date: Wed, 6 Sep 2000 07:19:08 -0700 (PDT)
> >
> >Dusti, thanks for your input.  I have done some
> >checking on clinical trials but the only ones I've
> >located are for people who haven't had surgery to
> >remove their tumors.  Since it was bile duct cancer,
> >that means it is primary liver cancer, so why chemo to
> >the whole body?  I've done a lot of research and what
> >I've found says radiation is a treatment, but that
> >chemo has not been shown to be effective.  Perhaps
> >Bridget could shed some more light on this.
> >
> >Also, Bridget, I was wondering if you had surgery?
> >
> >Your new friend,
> >Brenda
> >
> >
> >__________________________________________________
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