Re: [MOL] Info. on Tamoxifen [00201] Medicine On Line


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Re: [MOL] Info. on Tamoxifen



Good article, Lillian.
I am constantly amazed by how frivilously drugs are made available to the 
public. Too often it appears to be a political decision rather than a sound, 
medical one. In my mind, taking this drug is like playing Russian  Roulette 
with your life. Why do doctors continue to prescribe dangerous drugs and why 
aren't the women taking it better informed? As always it gives just one more 
reason why we must each take control over our own treatments by learning as 
much as possible about our own type of cancer and the pros and cons of 
alternative treatments.
Having cancer isn't like having the flu where we're pretty safe trusting the 
doctors advise and when it's over it's over. With cancer the doctor is often 
unfamiliar with your type and hasn't the time to do an in-depth research. 
And cancer is never over; once it has touched your life it remains with you, 
in one way or another.
If we start a new job the first thing we do is learn everything we can about 
it. In a lot of ways, cancer is like a new job in that it takes up a 
significant portion of our time, it's totally new to us and our future 
depends on the decisions we make. Personally I'm hoping for a promotion 
early so I'll be put on the fast track to health. (Boy, is that hokey or 
what?).
'Til later, your friend,
Bridget


>From: "Lillian" <firefly@islc.net>
>Reply-To: mol-cancer@lists.meds.com
>To: "MOL" <mol-cancer@lists.meds.com>
>Subject: [MOL] Info. on Tamoxifen
>Date: Sun, 3 Sep 2000 20:03:12 -0700
>
>No doubt you've seen and heard the tremendous media hype on the synthetic
> > hormone tamoxifen. The news about tamoxifen swept. the nation in early 
>April
> > when the National Cancer Institute held an unprecedented press 
>conference on
> > a study they had sponsored to test tamoxifen as a preventative for 
>breast
> > cancer.
> >   Is it hope or hype?
> >  Four years earlier, the FDA issued a damning press release of its own. 
>The
> > document informed 380,000 oncologist and health care professionals that 
>a
> > stronger warning label would be required for the drug, due to its 
>tendency
> > to cause cancer.
> >   Then FDA Commissioner David Kessler noted that it was "important for 
>women
> > to recognize that there are side effects including an increased risk of
> > uterine cancer." How much risk?  A Swedish study with almost 1,400 
>patients
> > found  that uterine cancer jumped a colossal 575%. (Another tamozifen 
>study
> > indicated a similar spike with the same cancer.) Furthermore, the tumors
> > were much more frequently "high grade," according to a study published 
>in
> > the Journal of Clinical Oncology in March of 1994.
> >  Why the hype, then? Is tamoxifen safe or not? And is there a better
> > solution for preventing breast cancer than a drug that apparently trades 
>one
> > cancer for another?
> >  NCI seemed to give tamoxifen a big boost when the lead author for the 
>big
> > study, Dr. Bernard Fisher, boldly announced, "This is now the first 
>study in
> > the world to show that a drug can reduce the incidence of breast 
>cancer."
> > The story received glowing widespread coverage, including a11 three TV
> > networks and CNN.
> >  But not so fast! NCI director Dr. Richard Klausner told reporters, 
>"There.
> > is no simple take-home message. There are important and serious side 
>effects
> > from this drug." In addition to uterine cancer, it also increases the
> > chances of blood dots that could result in strokes or sudden death, and
> > damage to the eyes.
> >  Tibor J, .Hegedus, PhD, in his book . Indicted: Cancer Research, writes
> > that tamoxifen does indeed block a cancer promoting hormone present in
> > breast tissue, ' but, "When the hormones are blocked from reaching the
> > primary targets, they are forced to travel to other organs."
> >  Seventeen British researchers also criticized the $65 million NCI 
>funded
> > study for stopping 14 months early. "I think there has been a 
>significant
> > overreaction," stated London's Trevor Powles, MD, who led the first 
>study on
> > the preventive effects of tamoxifen.
> >  The study's early release coincided with the first week of the American
> > Cancer Society's annual fund raising drive. This would not be the first 
>time
> > the two organizations spouted "good news" in recent weeks. Only two 
>weeks
> > earlier, NCI signed onto a major publicity release authored by the 
>American
> > Cancer Society. (See Progress Against Cancer, page 1.)
> >  The up side to tamoxifen, according to the 13,355 woman study, is that 
>it
> > reduced the arrival of breast cancer in the second breast by 45% for 
>those
> > women who already had breast cancer. But, as intimated by Dr. Hegedus 
>above,
> > the patient might be trading cancers by using tamoxifen.
> >  Is there a way to knock back the chance of developing breast cancer 
>without
> > playing Tamoxifen roulette? If the studies are accurate, one way might 
>be
> > the natural soy-based substance called genistein taken with a program of
> > diet and nutrients. Genistein is an isoflavone with steroid like 
>properties.
> >  One study conducted by Dr. Walter Troll at the NY University Medical 
>Center
> > showed breast cancer incidence in mice was reduced by 50%. In another 
>study
> > by Dr. Coral A. Lamartiniere of the University of Alabama the incidence 
>of
> > mammary tumors in mice were reduced by 40%. He told an NCI symposium, 
>"This
> > study is the first to show in vivo that Genistein can protect against
> > chemically induced cancer."
> >  Not everyone at the symposium was willing to accept the idea of soy,
> > however. Daniel Sheehan, PhD, countered, "I disagree that soy has been
> > proven safe." Of course, soy is a food item on the FDA's GRAS (Generally
> > Regarded as Safe) list.
> >  Meanwhile, researchers at the Wayne Hughes Institute in St. Paul,
> > Minnesota; reported their results with a new treatment they call "
> > EGF-Genistein.". According to a study published in Clinical Cancer 
>Research
> > in April of this year, the Genistein actually reversed human breast 
>.cancer
> > in mice and was found to be safe in small animals and monkeys.
> >  The same mechanism found in breast cancer cells is also seen in 
>prostate,
> > ovarian, bladder, liver, lung and melanoma. Thus, the researchers 
>believe
> > that Genistein will also be effective against those cancers as well. In
> > fact, Memorial Sloan Kettering researcher William Fair, MD, is now 
>studying
> > Genistein and other nutrients in a four arm clinical trial on prostate
> > cancer at the normally conservative and conventional NYC institution.
> >   Further, Dr. Karl Folkers of the. University of Texas and a team of
> > researchers in Europe reported that changes in diet and a specific list 
>of
> > nutrients eliminated breast cancer and pre- vented its recurrence. They
> > called it the Stockholm Protocol.
> >  While tamoxifen's supposed benefits are restricted to the breast and to
> > only a small percentage of women, it would appear that exercise, a diet 
>high
> > m soy, and supple- mental Genistein and a comprehensive program such as 
>the
> > Stockholm Protocol might be far more beneficial without-'the risks of
> > tamoxifen.
> >  Those interested in more information about diet, nutrition and the
> > Stockholm Protocol are urged to join People Against Cancer. 
>515-972-4444,
> > Fae 515-972-4415email: info@PeopleAgainstCancer.com .
> >
> > One of my good friends has just sent me a copy of an article entitled,
> > "SOY--A PERFECT FOOD?" from the Harvard Heart Letter of October 1998.  I 
>am
> > going to add an excerpt from that article.
> >
> > Today many experts believe that much of the special value of soy lies in
> > chemicals called isoflavones--plant hormones that appear to have 
>antioxidant
> > potential and antiatherogenic  properties, as well as favorable effects 
>on
> > blood-vessel function.  The most significant  isoflavones are called
> > genistein and daidzin.  These substances are found only in soybeans and
> > exhibit cholesterol lowering properties similar to those produced by
> > estrogen.
> >
> > might be of value to try to find products made from Soybeans such as 
>Tofu,
> > Soy Flour, Soy milk, etc. And gradually add them to the diet as a source 
>of
> > genestein.
> >
> > At the close of the article it says for more information, call the soy
> > hotline {1-800-TALK SOY] or visit the soy Web site http://www.soyfoods. 
>No
> > doubt you've seen and heard the tremendous media hype on the synthetic
> > hormone tamoxifen. The news about tamoxifen swept. the nation in early 
>April
> > when the National Cancer Institute held an unprecedented press 
>conference on
> > a study they had sponsored to test tamoxifen as a preventative for 
>breast
> > cancer.
> >   Is it hope or hype?
> >  Four years earlier, the FDA issued a damning press release of its own. 
>The
> > document informed 380,000 oncologist and health care professionals that 
>a
> > stronger warning label would be required for the drug, due to its 
>tendency
> > to cause cancer.
> >   Then FDA Commissioner David Kessler noted that it was "important for 
>women
> > to recognize that there are side effects including an increased risk of
> > uterine cancer." How much risk?  A Swedish study with almost 1,400 
>patients
> > found  that uterine cancer jumped a colossal 575%. (Another tamozifen 
>study
> > indicated a similar spike with the same cancer.) Furthermore, the tumors
> > were much more frequently "high grade," according to a study published 
>in
> > the Journal of Clinical Oncology in March of 1994.
> >  Why the hype, then? Is tamoxifen safe or not? And is there a better
> > solution for preventing breast cancer than a drug that apparently trades 
>one
> > cancer for another?
> >  NCI seemed to give tamoxifen a big boost when the lead author for the 
>big
> > study, Dr. Bernard Fisher, boldly announced, "This is now the first 
>study in
> > the world to show that a drug can reduce the incidence of breast 
>cancer."
> > The story received glowing widespread coverage, including a11 three TV
> > networks and CNN.
> >  But not so fast! NCI director Dr. Richard Klausner told reporters, 
>"There.
> > is no simple take-home message. There are important and serious side 
>effects
> > from this drug." In addition to uterine cancer, it also increases the
> > chances of blood dots that could result in strokes or sudden death, and
> > damage to the eyes.
> >  Tibor J, .Hegedus, PhD, in his book . Indicted: Cancer Research, writes
> > that tamoxifen does indeed block a cancer promoting hormone present in
> > breast tissue, ' but, "When the hormones are blocked from reaching the
> > primary targets, they are forced to travel to other organs."
> >  Seventeen British researchers also criticized the $65 million NCI 
>funded
> > study for stopping 14 months early. "I think there has been a 
>significant
> > overreaction," stated London's Trevor Powles, MD, who led the first 
>study on
> > the preventive effects of tamoxifen.
> >  The study's early release coincided with the first week of the American
> > Cancer Society's annual fund raising drive. This would not be the first 
>time
> > the two organizations spouted "good news" in recent weeks. Only two 
>weeks
> > earlier, NCI signed onto a major publicity release authored by the 
>American
> > Cancer Society. (See Progress Against Cancer, page 1.)
> >  The up side to tamoxifen, according to the 13,355 woman study, is that 
>it
> > reduced the arrival of breast cancer in the second breast by 45% for 
>those
> > women who already had breast cancer. But, as intimated by Dr. Hegedus 
>above,
> > the patient might be trading cancers by using tamoxifen.
>
>
>
>We invite you to take a look at our Album.
>www.angelfire.com/sc/molangels/index.html
>
>   ( Very informational, good tips, Molers pictures, art work and much 
>more....
>

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