[MOL] Info. on Tamoxifen [00154] Medicine On Line


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

[MOL] Info. on Tamoxifen



No doubt you've seen and heard the tremendous media hype on the synthetic
> hormone tamoxifen. The news about tamoxifen swept. the nation in early April
> when the National Cancer Institute held an unprecedented press conference on
> a study they had sponsored to test tamoxifen as a preventative for breast
> cancer.
>   Is it hope or hype?
>  Four years earlier, the FDA issued a damning press release of its own. The
> document informed 380,000 oncologist and health care professionals that a
> stronger warning label would be required for the drug, due to its tendency
> to cause cancer.
>   Then FDA Commissioner David Kessler noted that it was "important for women
> to recognize that there are side effects including an increased risk of
> uterine cancer." How much risk?  A Swedish study with almost 1,400 patients
> found  that uterine cancer jumped a colossal 575%. (Another tamozifen study
> indicated a similar spike with the same cancer.) Furthermore, the tumors
> were much more frequently "high grade," according to a study published in
> the Journal of Clinical Oncology in March of 1994.
>  Why the hype, then? Is tamoxifen safe or not? And is there a better
> solution for preventing breast cancer than a drug that apparently trades one
> cancer for another?
>  NCI seemed to give tamoxifen a big boost when the lead author for the big
> study, Dr. Bernard Fisher, boldly announced, "This is now the first study in
> the world to show that a drug can reduce the incidence of breast cancer."
> The story received glowing widespread coverage, including a11 three TV
> networks and CNN.
>  But not so fast! NCI director Dr. Richard Klausner told reporters, "There.
> is no simple take-home message. There are important and serious side effects
> from this drug." In addition to uterine cancer, it also increases the
> chances of blood dots that could result in strokes or sudden death, and
> damage to the eyes.
>  Tibor J, .Hegedus, PhD, in his book . Indicted: Cancer Research, writes
> that tamoxifen does indeed block a cancer promoting hormone present in
> breast tissue, ' but, "When the hormones are blocked from reaching the
> primary targets, they are forced to travel to other organs."
>  Seventeen British researchers also criticized the $65 million NCI funded
> study for stopping 14 months early. "I think there has been a significant
> overreaction," stated London's Trevor Powles, MD, who led the first study on
> the preventive effects of tamoxifen.
>  The study's early release coincided with the first week of the American
> Cancer Society's annual fund raising drive. This would not be the first time
> the two organizations spouted "good news" in recent weeks. Only two weeks
> earlier, NCI signed onto a major publicity release authored by the American
> Cancer Society. (See Progress Against Cancer, page 1.)
>  The up side to tamoxifen, according to the 13,355 woman study, is that it
> reduced the arrival of breast cancer in the second breast by 45% for those
> women who already had breast cancer. But, as intimated by Dr. Hegedus above,
> the patient might be trading cancers by using tamoxifen.
>  Is there a way to knock back the chance of developing breast cancer without
> playing Tamoxifen roulette? If the studies are accurate, one way might be
> the natural soy-based substance called genistein taken with a program of
> diet and nutrients. Genistein is an isoflavone with steroid like properties.
>  One study conducted by Dr. Walter Troll at the NY University Medical Center
> showed breast cancer incidence in mice was reduced by 50%. In another study
> by Dr. Coral A. Lamartiniere of the University of Alabama the incidence of
> mammary tumors in mice were reduced by 40%. He told an NCI symposium, "This
> study is the first to show in vivo that Genistein can protect against
> chemically induced cancer."
>  Not everyone at the symposium was willing to accept the idea of soy,
> however. Daniel Sheehan, PhD, countered, "I disagree that soy has been
> proven safe." Of course, soy is a food item on the FDA's GRAS (Generally
> Regarded as Safe) list.
>  Meanwhile, researchers at the Wayne Hughes Institute in St. Paul,
> Minnesota; reported their results with a new treatment they call "
> EGF-Genistein.". According to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research
> in April of this year, the Genistein actually reversed human breast .cancer
> in mice and was found to be safe in small animals and monkeys.
>  The same mechanism found in breast cancer cells is also seen in prostate,
> ovarian, bladder, liver, lung and melanoma. Thus, the researchers believe
> that Genistein will also be effective against those cancers as well. In
> fact, Memorial Sloan Kettering researcher William Fair, MD, is now studying
> Genistein and other nutrients in a four arm clinical trial on prostate
> cancer at the normally conservative and conventional NYC institution.
>   Further, Dr. Karl Folkers of the. University of Texas and a team of
> researchers in Europe reported that changes in diet and a specific list of
> nutrients eliminated breast cancer and pre- vented its recurrence. They
> called it the Stockholm Protocol.
>  While tamoxifen's supposed benefits are restricted to the breast and to
> only a small percentage of women, it would appear that exercise, a diet high
> m soy, and supple- mental Genistein and a comprehensive program such as the
> Stockholm Protocol might be far more beneficial without-'the risks of
> tamoxifen.
>  Those interested in more information about diet, nutrition and the
> Stockholm Protocol are urged to join People Against Cancer. 515-972-4444,
> Fae 515-972-4415email:
info@PeopleAgainstCancer.com .
>
> One of my good friends has just sent me a copy of an article entitled,
> "SOY--A PERFECT FOOD?" from the Harvard Heart Letter of October 1998.  I am
> going to add an excerpt from that article.
>
> Today many experts believe that much of the special value of soy lies in
> chemicals called isoflavones--plant hormones that appear to have antioxidant
> potential and antiatherogenic  properties, as well as favorable effects on
> blood-vessel function.  The most significant  isoflavones are called
> genistein and daidzin.  These substances are found only in soybeans and
> exhibit cholesterol lowering properties similar to those produced by
> estrogen.
>
> might be of value to try to find products made from Soybeans such as Tofu,
> Soy Flour, Soy milk, etc. And gradually add them to the diet as a source of
> genestein.
>
> At the close of the article it says for more information, call the soy
> hotline {1-800-TALK SOY] or visit the soy Web site
http://www.soyfoods. No
> doubt you've seen and heard the tremendous media hype on the synthetic
> hormone tamoxifen. The news about tamoxifen swept. the nation in early April
> when the National Cancer Institute held an unprecedented press conference on
> a study they had sponsored to test tamoxifen as a preventative for breast
> cancer.
>   Is it hope or hype?
>  Four years earlier, the FDA issued a damning press release of its own. The
> document informed 380,000 oncologist and health care professionals that a
> stronger warning label would be required for the drug, due to its tendency
> to cause cancer.
>   Then FDA Commissioner David Kessler noted that it was "important for women
> to recognize that there are side effects including an increased risk of
> uterine cancer." How much risk?  A Swedish study with almost 1,400 patients
> found  that uterine cancer jumped a colossal 575%. (Another tamozifen study
> indicated a similar spike with the same cancer.) Furthermore, the tumors
> were much more frequently "high grade," according to a study published in
> the Journal of Clinical Oncology in March of 1994.
>  Why the hype, then? Is tamoxifen safe or not? And is there a better
> solution for preventing breast cancer than a drug that apparently trades one
> cancer for another?
>  NCI seemed to give tamoxifen a big boost when the lead author for the big
> study, Dr. Bernard Fisher, boldly announced, "This is now the first study in
> the world to show that a drug can reduce the incidence of breast cancer."
> The story received glowing widespread coverage, including a11 three TV
> networks and CNN.
>  But not so fast! NCI director Dr. Richard Klausner told reporters, "There.
> is no simple take-home message. There are important and serious side effects
> from this drug." In addition to uterine cancer, it also increases the
> chances of blood dots that could result in strokes or sudden death, and
> damage to the eyes.
>  Tibor J, .Hegedus, PhD, in his book . Indicted: Cancer Research, writes
> that tamoxifen does indeed block a cancer promoting hormone present in
> breast tissue, ' but, "When the hormones are blocked from reaching the
> primary targets, they are forced to travel to other organs."
>  Seventeen British researchers also criticized the $65 million NCI funded
> study for stopping 14 months early. "I think there has been a significant
> overreaction," stated London's Trevor Powles, MD, who led the first study on
> the preventive effects of tamoxifen.
>  The study's early release coincided with the first week of the American
> Cancer Society's annual fund raising drive. This would not be the first time
> the two organizations spouted "good news" in recent weeks. Only two weeks
> earlier, NCI signed onto a major publicity release authored by the American
> Cancer Society. (See Progress Against Cancer, page 1.)
>  The up side to tamoxifen, according to the 13,355 woman study, is that it
> reduced the arrival of breast cancer in the second breast by 45% for those
> women who already had breast cancer. But, as intimated by Dr. Hegedus above,
> the patient might be trading cancers by using tamoxifen.

 
 
We invite you to take a look at our Album.                                               
www.angelfire.com/sc/molangels/index.html
 
  ( Very informational, good tips, Molers pictures, art work and much more....