Re: [MOL] Alternative Treatments-lung Cancer/REPLY TO TOM [01886] Medicine On Line


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Re: [MOL] Alternative Treatments-lung Cancer/REPLY TO TOM



Yes, the cyber hwy. medical sites do say that low dose/more frequent chemo
therapy is  effective for most cancers.

I thought you might find these articles interesting friend.  i suspect the
reason you are not hearing of more people using said is because the
predictions were hyped....


he Wall Street Journal -- February 12, 1999 Health:

EntreMed Reverses Midweek Stock Loss As NCI Verifies an Anti-Tumor Agent

----

By Ralph T. King Jr. Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

EntreMed Inc.'s stock reversed sharp losses from earlier in the week on yet
another piece of cancer-related news, a positive finding on one of its
controversial antitumor agents about which some scientists remain skeptical.

National Cancer Institute officials said they were able to verify that one
of EntreMed's two anticancer agents, endostatin, showed some activity
against tumors in laboratory mice, indicating the agent still holds
experimental promise. Endostatin and another agent, angiostatin, generated
excitement last year after EntreMed's partner, Harvard researcher Judah
Folkman, reported that the two agents in combination wiped out mouse tumors.

In recent months, the work has been questioned because scientists, including
Dr. Folkman's collaborators at NCI, had trouble replicating his lab's work.
Just Tuesday, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., which licensed angiostatin from
EntreMed, announced that it would halt development of the agent after three
years of work.

EntreMed's stock doubled yesterday, closing at $25.6875, up $12.8125, in
Nasdaq Stock Market trading. The small Rockville, Md., biotechnology
company's stock lost about half its value Wednesday, closing at $12.875,
down $11.625, following the Bristol-Myers announcement.

Whether the two agents can eradicate tumors not just in mice but in humans
is still open to question. And some scientists say that confirmation in
someone else's lab doesn't amount to verificiation.

"Independent confirmation of Folkman would be very exciting; however, these
results don't qualify as such," said George Yancopoulos, chief scientific
officer at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc., an expert in the blood-vessel
field.

"What worries me is that several years after the discovery of endostatin,
there is still no explanation for how it works. It's still black magic," Dr.
Yancopoulos added.

In any case, NCI officials said they are now seeking investigators to begin
human safety trials of endostatin before the end of the year. And an
EntreMed spokeswoman said the company will seek regulatory approval for
trials of angiostatin during the fourth quarter.

The seemingly contradictory events involving Dr. Folkman's work illustrate
the twists and turns of verifying scientific data and translating them into
medical advances. While encouraged, Robert Wittes, NCI deputy director of
extramural science, said, "We have to make sure it's synthesizable outside
Boston," where Dr. Folkman's lab is located. He also warned that important
toxicology and production issues must be resolved by EntreMed before
endostatin can enter human trials.

After observing the methods of lab workers first-hand, NCI scientists were
able to perform the same detailed technical steps and achieve shrinkage of
small tumors in treated mice, Dr. Wittes said.

NCI scientists hope to obtain the same results in their own labs in
Frederick, Md., in the near future under the direction of researchers from
Dr. Folkman's lab.

"There are 25 possibilities of what we may have been doing wrong. This
protein is very touchy," Dr. Wittes said. "We don't think we swept away all
the questions, but we think the essence of what they reported is right."

http://www.biocognizance.com/angio.htm


> My brother was recently diagnosed with Stage lllB non small cell lung
cancer.
>  He was immediately put on Taxol and Carboplatin, every three weeks.   I
have
> now read that low dose, more frequent  treatments, are preferable because
> they cause fewer side effects.  Is this true in the experience of anyone
> on-line?  Also I have not heard much in this group about anti-angiogenesis
> agents being used.  I've read a lot about them on the www,  but finding
> people with actual experience with them is difficult.
> My point is that if low dose chemo, or  ant-angiogenesis agents,  are the
new
> "best way" to treat nsclc and other cancers,  then why don't I see more
about
> them from real people with the cancers?
> Help, I want the best for my big brother!       Tom in Florida
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