Re: [MOL] Herbal Soup.... ls. read full article.... [02001] Medicine On Line


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Re: [MOL] Herbal Soup.... ls. read full article....



I would take this article (and soup) with a grain of salt!  It seems a PR 
piece for the manufacturer, Dr. Sun.  I've investigated this some time ago 
and was not persuaded to pursue it.  Just my opinion.  Bess
In a message dated 4/23/00 8:19:23 PM, you wrote:

<<

--------------------
Herbal Soup Extends Life for Some Lung Cancer Patients

Reetpaul Rana, Medical Writer 

A recent study published in the journal Nutrition and Cancer shows a 
substantial increase in survival time and an improved quality of life with a 
daily dose of an herbal vegetable broth. The results suggest that, when taken 
daily, in addition to the patient's regimen of chemotherapy or radiation, the 
broth might help patients with advanced-stage lung cancer live longer and 
healthier lives. 


The broth-which contains herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine, lentils, 
and vegetables-was developed by Dr. Alexander Sun, a biochemist at the 
Connecticut Institute on Aging and Cancer. Compared to patients who only 
received chemotherapy, a group of patients who also ate the broth increased 
their lives by nearly 1 year. 


This type of study does not normally get much attention in standard cancer 
research, but Dr. Jeffrey D. White, director of the Office of Complimentary 
and Alternative Medicine for the National Cancer Institute, does not dismiss 
the broth approach. It is "not definitive data," he says, but "this kind of 
data does give some justification for further study." 



Necessity Becomes Inventor's Mother


           

                  .until now, no studies have examined whether vegetables can 
actually increase your life span when you are battling a life-threatening 
cancer.  

           


           

     

Physicians have only recently emphasized the role of nutrition in cancer 
prevention. Studies suggest that diets high in vegetables and fiber may be 
very helpful in preventing certain types of cancer. In fact, healthy diets 
may have contributed to the drop in overall cancer-related deaths in the last 
10 years. But until now, no studies have examined whether vegetables can 
actually increase your life span when you are battling a life-threatening 
cancer. 

Dr. Sun's investigation of the broth began when his own mother discovered she 
had an advanced- stage case of non-small-cell lung cancer. Faced with the 
same news of certain death that confronts nearly 400,000 people every year in 
the Western world, Dr. Sun began a quest to concoct a complementary herbal 
treatment. 


After months of treatment with conventional radiation and chemotherapy, Dr. 
Sun's mother saw little improvement. When she began taking her son's broth, 
however, her condition actually began to turn around. 


Since Dr. Sun knew his story would sound like a fairy tale to most 
oncologists, he decided to put the broth to the test of science. During his 
search for a collaborating partner, Dr. Sun came across a scientist who was 
so enthusiastic about the broth that he offered to help conduct the study at 
a hospital in his home country, the Czech Republic. 


In general, the most advanced non-small-cell lung cancers are extremely 
fatal: Most patients die within 6 months. In Dr. Sun's study, however, 
patients taking the broth survived, on average, 15 months, a remarkable 
difference. 



The Critics Weigh In

Dr. Sun's vegetable broth may sound like a welcome supplement for someone 
facing a deadly disease, but doubt has been expressed from all sides of the 
debate-patients and doctors, believers and skeptics. Many of the criticisms 
of Dr. Sun's research focus on the study's small number of participants and 
lack of defined structure. 

Dr. Bruce Johnson, director of the Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology at 
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, concedes, "Diet and nutrition are pretty 
important." He is not convinced, however, that nutrition can play a major 
role in curing cancer. Dr. Johnson admits the vegetable broth supplement 
"could potentially help and do something," but he says the study's design 
"falls short in almost every thing we ever do in clinical studies." 



           

                  Even researchers who are sympathetic to alternative 
therapies.have some criticism of the study's methods.  

           


           

     

Johnson says the study provides no precise information about dosage and 
response. Also, another complication, he says, is that "the study compares 
patients in different stages of the disease, with varying treatments." To 
better assess the effects of this broth, Dr. Johnson thinks it would be 
better to compare patient's performance on a level playing field. 


Even researchers who are sympathetic to alternative therapies, like Dr. 
White, have some criticism of the study's methods. Dr. White says Dr. Sun's 
study has too few patients and uses an imprecise approach to measuring the 
effects of the broth on the patients' cancer. 


Instead of making objective assessments like measuring the tumor or 
determining how much it has shrunk, says Dr. White, the study subjectively 
evaluated the daily life functioning of a cancer sufferer. Dr. Sun agrees, 
but says that costly MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans-which would 
provide more definitive data-made that kind of analysis out of the question 
for this preliminary study. 


Also, Dr. White says survival time alone is not very informative, since the 
patients are also undergoing chemotherapy, and that may be causing some of 
the improvement. But according to Dr. Sun, "Whoever is a skeptic, frankly, 
they are naive about [the] whole process of developmental trials." He says he 
would never be able to get support for larger studies without first doing 
smaller studies in stages. 



More Trials Needed

Dr. Sun reports that he has received quite a bit of encouragement from 
colleagues in the medical establishment. He has been presenting the results 
of this study at several medical conferences over the past 2 years, and he 
says many people tell him his work is the "strongest data in the field of 
alternative medicine." 

Dr. Sun's work is far from done. He is now looking for funding sources for a 
large-scale controlled study of his vegetable broth. Beyond that, there is 
the matter of identifying how the broth works, if it does. "Certainly the 
individual components [of the broth] are not so powerful," he says. There 
"may be a synergistic effect. There is lots of research that needs to be 
done." 


This kind of research is precisely what alternative and complementary 
medicine needs, says Dr. White. "We need to see prospective studies to 
clinical data on products like these." After all, he says, it is "the only 
way we will really get some answers whether or not these things have 
significant effects on quality of life." 


Derided by many medical researchers as "imprecise" and "unscientific," herbs 
are nevertheless responsible for several important drugs like protease 
inhibitors, and several antitumor agents.




We invite you to take a look at our Album.                                    
            

www.angelfire.com/sc/molangels/index.html 


  ( Very informational, good tips, Molers pictures, art work and much more....


--------------------
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<META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>

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<DIV>Herbal Soup 

Extends Life for Some Lung Cancer Patients
Reetpaul Rana, Medical 

Writer 

A recent study published in the journal <EM>Nutrition 

and Cancer</EM> shows a substantial increase in survival time and an improved 

quality of life with a daily dose of an herbal 

vegetable broth. The results suggest that, when taken daily, in addition to 

the patient's regimen of chemotherapy or radiation, the broth might help 

patients with advanced-stage lung cancer live longer and healthier lives. 

The broth&#8211;which contains herbs 

used in traditional Chinese medicine, lentils, and vegetables&#8211;was 
developed by 

Dr. Alexander Sun, a biochemist at the Connecticut Institute on Aging and 

Cancer. Compared to patients who only received chemotherapy, a group of 
patients 

who also ate the broth increased their lives by nearly 1 year. 

This type of study does not normally get much attention in standard cancer 

research, but Dr. Jeffrey D. White, director of the Office of Complimentary 
and 

Alternative Medicine for the National Cancer Institute, does not dismiss the 

broth approach. It is "not definitive data," he says, but "this kind of data 

does give some justification for further study." 


Necessity Becomes Inventor's Mother


<TABLE align=left border=0 cellPadding=5 cellSpacing=0 width=156>

  <TBODY>

  <TR>

    <TD>

      <TABLE align=left border=0 cellPadding=3 cellSpacing=0 width=146>

        <TBODY>

        <TR>

          <TD bgColor=#66ccff height=2><IMG border=0 height=1 

            
src="http://healthwatch.medscape.com/medscape/p/G_library/i/dot.gif" 

            width=146>
</TD></TR>

        <TR>

          <TD bgColor=#ffffff>

            <TABLE border=0 cellPadding=3 cellSpacing=0 width="100%">

              <TBODY>

              <TR>

                <TD bgColor=#ffffff>&#8230;until now, no studies have 

                  examined whether vegetables can actually increase your life 

                  span when you are battling a life-threatening cancer. 

                  </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR>

        <TR>

          <TD bgColor=#66ccff height=2><IMG border=0 height=1 

            
src="http://healthwatch.medscape.com/medscape/p/G_library/i/dot.gif" 

            width=146>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>Physicians 

have only recently emphasized the role of nutrition in cancer prevention. 

Studies suggest that diets high in vegetables and fiber may be very helpful 
in 

preventing certain types of cancer. In fact, healthy diets may have 
contributed 

to the drop in overall cancer-related deaths in the last 10 years. But until 

now, no studies have examined whether vegetables can actually increase your 
life 

span when you are battling a life-threatening cancer. 

Dr. Sun's investigation of the broth began when his own mother discovered she 

had an advanced- stage case of non-small-cell lung cancer. Faced with the 
same 

news of certain death that confronts nearly 400,000 people every year in the 

Western world, Dr. Sun began a quest to concoct a complementary herbal 

treatment. 

After months of treatment with conventional radiation and chemotherapy, Dr. 

Sun's mother saw little improvement. When she began taking her son's broth, 

however, her condition actually began to turn around. 

Since Dr. Sun knew his story would sound like a fairy tale to most 

oncologists, he decided to put the broth to the test of science. During his 

search for a collaborating partner, Dr. Sun came across a scientist who was 
so 

enthusiastic about the broth that he offered to help conduct the study at a 

hospital in his home country, the Czech Republic. 

In general, the most advanced non-small-cell lung cancers are extremely 

fatal: Most patients die within 6 months. In Dr. Sun's study, however, 
patients 

taking the broth survived, on average, 15 months, a remarkable difference. 


The Critics Weigh In
Dr. Sun's vegetable broth may sound like a welcome 

supplement for someone facing a deadly disease, but doubt has been expressed 

from all sides of the debate&#8211;patients and doctors, believers and 
skeptics. Many 

of the criticisms of Dr. Sun's research focus on the study's small number of 

participants and lack of defined structure. 

Dr. Bruce Johnson, director of the Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology at 

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, concedes, "Diet and nutrition are pretty 

important." He is not convinced, however, that nutrition can play a major 
role 

in curing cancer. Dr. Johnson admits the vegetable broth supplement "could 

potentially help and do something," but he says the study's design "falls 
short 

in almost every thing we ever do in clinical studies." 


<TABLE align=left border=0 cellPadding=5 cellSpacing=0 width=156>

  <TBODY>

  <TR>

    <TD>

      <TABLE align=left border=0 cellPadding=3 cellSpacing=0 width=146>

        <TBODY>

        <TR>

          <TD bgColor=#66ccff height=2><IMG border=0 height=1 

            
src="http://healthwatch.medscape.com/medscape/p/G_library/i/dot.gif" 

            width=146>
</TD></TR>

        <TR>

          <TD bgColor=#ffffff>

            <TABLE border=0 cellPadding=3 cellSpacing=0 width="100%">

              <TBODY>

              <TR>

                <TD bgColor=#ffffff>Even 

                  researchers who are sympathetic to alternative 
therapies&#8230;have 

                  some criticism of the study's methods. 

              </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR>

        <TR>

          <TD bgColor=#66ccff height=2><IMG border=0 height=1 

            
src="http://healthwatch.medscape.com/medscape/p/G_library/i/dot.gif" 

            width=146>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>Johnson says 

the study provides no precise information about dosage and response. Also, 

another complication, he says, is that "the study compares patients in 
different 

stages of the disease, with varying treatments." To better assess the effects 
of 

this broth, Dr. Johnson thinks it would be better to compare patient's 

performance on a level playing field. 

Even researchers who are sympathetic to alternative therapies, like Dr. 

White, have some criticism of the study's methods. Dr. White says Dr. Sun's 

study has too few patients and uses an imprecise approach to measuring the 

effects of the broth on the patients' cancer. 

Instead of making objective assessments like measuring the tumor or 

determining how much it has shrunk, says Dr. White, the study subjectively 

evaluated the daily life functioning of a cancer sufferer. Dr. Sun agrees, 
but 

says that costly MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scans&#8211;which would 
provide more 

definitive data&#8211;made that kind of analysis out of the question for this 

preliminary study. 

Also, Dr. White says survival time alone is not very informative, since the 

patients are also undergoing chemotherapy, and that may be causing some of 
the 

improvement. But according to Dr. Sun, "Whoever is a skeptic, frankly, they 
are 

naive about [the] whole process of developmental trials." He says he would 
never 

be able to get support for larger studies without first doing smaller studies 
in 

stages. 


More Trials Needed
Dr. Sun reports that he has received quite a bit of 

encouragement from colleagues in the medical establishment. He has been 

presenting the results of this study at several medical conferences over the 

past 2 years, and he says many people tell him his work is the "strongest 
data 

in the field of alternative medicine." 

Dr. Sun's work is far from done. He is now looking for funding sources for a 

large-scale controlled study of his vegetable broth. Beyond that, there is 
the 

matter of identifying how the broth works, if it does. "Certainly the 
individual 

components [of the broth] are not so powerful," he says. There "may be a 

synergistic effect. There is lots of research that needs to be done." 

This kind of research is precisely what alternative and complementary 

medicine needs, says Dr. White. "We need to see prospective studies to 
clinical 

data on products like these." After all, he says, it is "the only way we will 

really get some answers whether or not these things have significant effects 
on 

quality of life." 

Derided by many medical researchers as "imprecise" and "unscientific," herbs 

are nevertheless responsible for several important drugs like protease 

inhibitors, and several antitumor agents.</DIV>

<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>

<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>

<DIV>We invite you to take a look at our 

Album.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 


www.angelfire.com/sc/molangels/index.html 

</DIV>

<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>

<DIV>&nbsp; ( Very informational, good tips, Molers pictures, art 

work and much more....
</DIV>



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Subject: [MOL] Herbal Soup.... ls. read full article....
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