[MOL] Trends in the Use of Radical Prostatectomy for Treatment of Prosta [02420] Medicine On Line


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[MOL] Trends in the Use of Radical Prostatectomy for Treatment of Prostate Cancer



Dear FRiends,

Thought the following information may be of some use.



http://www.acponline.org/journals/ecp/sepoct99/ellison.htm

God Bless You All,
marty auslander
Title: Trends in the Use of Radical Prostatectomy for Treatment of Prostate Cancer
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Effective Clinical Practice

Trends in the Use of Radical Prostatectomy for Treatment of Prostate Cancer

Effective Clinical Practice, September/October 1999.

CONTEXT. The incidence of prostate cancer and rates of radical prostatectomy increased sharply in the Medicare population (men older than 65 years of age) after the introduction of prostate-specific antigen screening in the late 1980s.

PRACTICE PATTERN EXAMINED. Trends in age-specific rates of use of radical prostatectomy in U.S. men between 1989 and 1995.

DATA SOURCE. The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program.

RESULTS. Overall, rates of radical prostatectomy more than doubled between 1989 and 1992 (from 78 per 100,000 men to 206 per 100,000 men) but decreased by a third between 1992 and 1995 (to 146 per 100,000 men). The pattern in overall radical prostatectomy rates between 1992 and 1995, however, obscures changes that occurred for men in different age groups. Decreases in radical prostatectomy rates were most dramatic in elderly persons, dropping 51% in men 70 to 74 years of age and 71% in men 75 years of age or older. In contrast, rates in younger men continued to increase between 1992 and 1995, rising 42% in men 45 to 49 years of age and 18% in men 50 to 54 years of age. In each age group, trends in surgery rates mirrored trends in cancer detection rates.

CONCLUSIONS. Surgical treatment of prostate cancer in older men is decreasing; however, surgery rates are increasing in younger men. These divergent trends reflect the pattern of prostate cancer detection in clinical practice.


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