Re: [MOL] Subject: Drug for Iron Overload Passes Major Safety Hurdle.... [00882] Medicine On Line


[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: [MOL] Subject: Drug for Iron Overload Passes Major Safety Hurdle....



Dear Lil,

So glad it was informative.

God Bless you,
marty and Barb

Lillian wrote:
> 
> Marty:  Really appreciate this article for several reasons.  I knew there
> was a drug for serious iron loads; but they do not give this drug to a child
> under four year's of age; however I could not remember the name of it for
> the life of me.  Usually children are discovered with it after a parent has
> serious complications; so I will pat myself on the back for being so
> observing and pushing the issue.  Thanks for the great article.
> Warmly, lillian
> 
> We invite you to take a look at our Album.
> www.angelfire.com/sc/molangels/index.html
> 
>   ( Very informational, good tips, Molers pictures, art work and much
> more....
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Martin Auslander <fitecancer@earthlink.net>
> To: Medical On Line Forum <mol-cancer@lists.meds.com>; Lillian
> <firefly@islc.net>
> Sent: Thursday, March 09, 2000 6:56 AM
> Subject: [MOL] Subject: Drug for Iron Overload Passes Major Safety
> Hurdle....
> 
> > Good Morning All and our angel Lil,
> >
> > Was thinking about Lils Grandbaby and saw this message about Iron
> > Overload and wondered if Lil posted this and knew about this. She is so
> > up on things and probably this is something that she knew, but maybe
> > didnt. Hope this info is beneficial.
> >
> > Subject: Drug for Iron Overload Passes Major Safety Hurdle....
> >
> > Drug for Iron Overload Passes Major Safety Hurdle, May Benefit Patients
> > With
> > Thalassemia and Other Blood Disorders, According to Researchers At The
> > Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
> >
> > PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 22 /PRNewswire/ -- An oral medication that may be
> > helpful
> > for patients with thalassemia and related blood disorders has fewer
> > adverse
> > effects on white blood cells than previously predicted.  The drug,
> > deferiprone, may help patients with thalassemia who do not benefit from
> > the
> > conventional treatment for iron overload, a life-threatening
> > complication of
> > their disease.  A research team headed by a physician from The
> > Children's
> > Hospital of Philadelphia announced the results of their multicenter
> > study
> > today in the British Journal of Haematology.
> >
> > Thalassemia, an inherited disease of the blood in which hemoglobin fails
> > to
> > form properly, may be challenging to treat.  Depending on its severity,
> > the
> > disease may require regular blood transfusions starting in early
> > childhood
> > and may cause an enlarged spleen, bone weakness and growth problems.
> > The
> > blood transfusions lead to the most serious complication,
> > life-threatening
> > multiple organ damage caused by accumulation of excessive iron.
> > Therefore,
> > patients with iron overload receive frequent treatments with
> > desferrioxamine,
> > which removes iron from the tissues.  However, this drug is difficult to
> > administer, because it must be pumped into the skin or bloodstream for
> > an
> > 8-to-12-hour period every night.  Many patients do not comply with the
> > arduous regimen, and others are unable to use it because of adverse
> > reactions.
> >
> > Therefore, for the past 20 years, researchers have been seeking an
> > effective
> > oral medicine for iron overload.  The leading candidate has been
> > deferiprone,
> > but previous studies showed the medicine had a serious side effect
> > called
> > agranulocytosis, a sharp reduction in white blood cells.  The current
> > study
> > measured the frequency of that side effect in 187 pediatric and adult
> > patients at four sites, one at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
> > and
> > the other three at thalassemia centers in Italy.  The patients were
> > unable or
> > unwilling to use desferrioxamine.
> >
> > Patients in the study received weekly blood tests to monitor
> > deferiprone's
> > effects.  Agranulocytosis occurred in only one patient, while nine
> > patients
> > had a milder reduction in white blood cells (neutropenia).  "The study
> > showed
> > that toxicity to white blood cells is a rare side effect of deferiprone,
> > and
> > is not frequent enough to disqualify the drug as a potential treatment
> > for
> > iron overload," said Alan R. Cohen, M.D., chief of Hematology at The
> > Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and lead author of the study.
> > "Although
> > much research remains to be done, deferiprone might also be used to
> > treat
> > patients with other hemoglobin disorders, such as sickle cell disease,
> > in
> > which regular blood transfusions are often used."
> >
> > Dr. Cohen added that since the study began, other possible side effects
> > of
> > deferiprone have been suggested, such as liver toxicity, and that
> > further
> > studies need to address such concerns.  Like desferrioxamine,
> > deferiprone is
> > an iron chelator -- a chemical that binds to excess iron and removes it
> > from
> > the body.  "We are not proposing that deferiprone should replace
> > desferrioxamine as a first-line therapy for iron overload," he said.
> > "But it
> > may become an option for patients who do not respond to desferrioxamine
> > or
> > who have severe adverse reactions to that conventional therapy."
> >
> > The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the nation's first children's
> > hospital, is a leader in patient care, education and research.  This
> > 373-bed
> > multispecialty hospital provides comprehensive pediatric services,
> > including
> > home care, to children from before birth through age 19.  The hospital
> > is
> > second in the United States among all children's hospitals in total
> > research
> > funding from the National Institutes of Health.
> >
> > CONTACT:  Maria Stearns of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia,
> > 215-590-4091, or Stearnsm@email.chop.edu
> >
> >  SOURCE  The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
> >
> > ------------------------------
> > God Bless All,
> > marty auslander
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > This is an automatically-generated notice.  If you'd like to be removed
> > from the mailing list, please visit the Medicine-On-Line Discussion Forum
> > at <http://www.meds.com/con_faq.html>, or send an email message to:
> > majordomo@lists.meds.com
> > with the subject line blank and the body of the message containing the
> line:
> > unsubscribe mol-cancer your-email-address
> > where the phrase your-email-address is replaced with your actual email
> > address.
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This is an automatically-generated notice.  If you'd like to be removed
> from the mailing list, please visit the Medicine-On-Line Discussion Forum
> at <http://www.meds.com/con_faq.html>, or send an email message to:
> majordomo@lists.meds.com
> with the subject line blank and the body of the message containing the line:
> unsubscribe mol-cancer your-email-address
> where the phrase your-email-address is replaced with your actual email
> address.
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is an automatically-generated notice.  If you'd like to be removed
from the mailing list, please visit the Medicine-On-Line Discussion Forum
at <http://www.meds.com/con_faq.html>, or send an email message to:
majordomo@lists.meds.com
with the subject line blank and the body of the message containing the line:
unsubscribe mol-cancer your-email-address
where the phrase your-email-address is replaced with your actual email
address.
------------------------------------------------------------------------