[MOL] Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1999 21:01:16 -0800 [00468] Medicine On Line


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[MOL] Date: Tue, 16 Nov 1999 21:01:16 -0800




Warmly, lillian

We invite you to take a look at our Album.
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ATT00565.dat


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Stressed out? Rest assured.Anxiety-producing life events like losing a loved one or getting fired do not cause breast cancer, according to a study published in the October 16 issue of the British Medical Journal.

Researchers at the University of Leeds in Australia recently studied 332 women aged 40 to 79 with suspicious breast lumps. They found that the 106 women diagnosed with breast cancer were no more likely to have experienced severe stress in the past five years than those women diagnosed with benign breast disease. The only factors associated with increased risk were obesity, older age, postmenopausal status and late menopause.

The study, however, relied upon the women's recall of past stressful life events during an already stressful point in their lives. And while three other recent studies also found no correlation between cancer and a stressful life event, another indicated that women with cancer were 12 times more likely to have experienced a stressful life event.

Yet David Protheroe, MD, at Leeds General Infirmary, and a clinical teacher in psychiatry at Melbourne University who led the study, is comfortable with its finding. "Based on our results and the rest of the literature, I think we can safely reassure women that there is no credible evidence that stressful life events contribute to the development of breast cancer," he said. --Carin Gorrell

Warmly, lillian
 
We invite you to take a look at our Album.                                               
www.angelfire.com/sc/molangels/index.html
 
  ( Very informational, good tips, Molers pictures, art work and much more....
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