Re: [MOL] Breast Cancer Study Raises Questions/Reply to Gwen [00983] Medicine On Line


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Re: [MOL] Breast Cancer Study Raises Questions/Reply to Gwen



Interesting study, am amazed they did not include hair dye and perns.  I
should have them check our little poor area who also has a very high rate of
breast cancer and of heart conditions.  I do feel pollution plays a roll;
however I believe the DNA plays a larger roll, my opinion only.  How are you
doing Gwen, still waiting for an update on you love.
Warmly, lillian

We invite you to take a look at our Album.
www.angelfire.com/sc/molangels/index.html

  ( Very informational, good tips, Molers pictures, art work and much
more....

----- Original Message -----
From: <GW0123@AOL.COM>
To: <mol-cancer@lists.meds.com>
Sent: Monday, October 25, 1999 4:56 PM
Subject: [MOL] Breast Cancer Study Raises Questions


>
> Breast Cancer Study Raises Questions
>
> By SUSANNAH PATTON
> .c The Associated Press
>
>
> BOSTON (AP) - Researchers seeking clues about the high rate of breast
cancer
> among wealthy women have found potential environmental factors, including
> professional lawn and dry-cleaning services.
>
> Focusing on the Boston suburb of Newton, the researchers found women in
areas
> hit hardest by the disease used such services more often than those in
> less-affected neighborhoods.
>
> ``Obviously, neither money nor schooling cause breast cancer,'' said Dr.
> Nancy Maxwell, the lead researcher. ``With the Newton study we tried to
see
> if there might be environmental factors.''
>
> Maxwell cautioned there is no definitive evidence that chemicals or
> pesticides cause cancer. But she said the research points to the need for
> further investigation of possible connections.
>
> The rate of breast cancer in Newton was 13 percent higher than the
statewide
> rate between 1982 and 1992, state health officials said.
>
> The study ``has taken us one step further in trying to understand why
> socioeconomic status is a factor,'' said Suzanne Condon, director of
> environmental health assessment at the Massachusetts Department of Public
> Health. The department funded the study.
>
> The researchers from Silent Spring Institute, a nonprofit research
> organization, randomly questioned 1,350 women - not necessarily cancer
> patients - ages 35 to 75.
>
> The study showed that women in neighborhoods with higher rates of breast
> cancer typically had higher incomes and education levels than women in
areas
> with lower breast cancer rates.
>
> Known risk factors for breast cancer, such as delayed childbearing and
family
> history of the disease, accounted for only a small part of the difference
> between areas with high and low rates of breast cancer.
>
> But the survey did suggest possible environmental factors.
>
> For example, 65 percent of the women in the area with higher breast-cancer
> rates had used a professional lawn service, compared with 36 percent of
the
> women in the low-incidence neighborhood.
>
> In addition, 30 percent of those in the high-incidence area reported
routine
> use of pesticides, compared with 23 percent in the low-incidence sector.
And
> 45 percent of those in the high-incidence area used dry cleaning at least
> once a month, compared with 32 percent in the less-affected neighborhood.
>
> A spokesman for a national association of pesticide manufacturers stressed
> that studies have shown no conclusive links between breast cancer and
> environmental chemicals.
>
> ``We are concerned, however,'' said Chris Klose, a spokesman for the
American
> Crop Protection Association in Washington, D.C. ``We want people to use
> pesticides correctly.''
>
> A call seeking comment to the International Fabricare Institute, a trade
> association for dry cleaners, was not returned.
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