Re: [MOL] Fear ME! [02155] Medicine On Line


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Re: [MOL] Fear ME!



Dear Lil, I am absolutely convinced you can do anything you set your mind
to. So get out there and BLOW girl!!!
Marianne

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From: lillian jennings <firefly@islc.net>
To: mol-cancer@lists.meds.com
Subject: Re: [MOL] Fear ME!
Date: Tuesday, August 25, 1998 2:06 PM

Marianne:  You just don't know how good it is to have you and Wayne
back........so far so good, Fla. will probably not be hit by this storm,
not
sure about Ga. and S.C. yet.  It makes you feel bad, because you don't want
it
to hit you; but then you really don't want it to hit anywhere.  I have
allot of
hot air, perhaps if I stand in the right position I can huff and puff and
blow
it back out to sea?  Love your friend, Lillian

W&M ROSE wrote:

> Thank you Lil for this info. Ps are you still ok there?
> Love Marianne  xxxxx
>
> ----------
> From: lillian jennings <firefly@islc.net>
> To: mol-cancer@lists.meds.com
> Subject: [MOL] Molers, pls. read this, important!
> Date: Tuesday, August 25, 1998 12:47 PM
>
>  
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>
> My Dear Friends:  It is so important that you read the below and keep it
> in a file; as this can easily happen to those who have taken chemo or
> radiation.  I do not mean to frighten you; but it can take up to 3
> year's before one realizes they have it.  This is what happened to me, I
> went a year and ended up in a coma.  This particular article doesn't
> touch the adrenal glands and mine were severely damaged; which creates
> another set of problems. Now, also know it doesn't happen to everyone;
> but if you start having vague complaints, the skin starts drying and
> appears leathery, it is a good sign.  I also had very severe back pain
> with it due to the adrenal glands. Love your friend, lillian
>
> Definition
>
> Hypothyroidism is a clinical syndrome that results from a deficiency of
> thyroid hormone, which in turn results in a generalized slowing down of
> metabolic processes. A hydrophilic mucopolysaccharide(glycosaminoglycan)
> accumulates in subcutaneous tissue, particularly in the skin and muscle,
> causing a nonpitting edema referred as myxedema.
>
> Etiology
>
> Hypothyroidism may be classified as (1) Primary (thyroid failure), (2)
> secondary (due to pituitary TSH deficit), tertiary (due to hypothalamic
> deficiency of TRH) or may be due to (4) peripheral resistance to the
> action of thyroid hormones.
>
> Primary hypothyroidism, that caused by thyroid gland malfunction,
> accounts for 95 per cent of hypothyroidism cases, and only 5 per cent or
> less are suprathyroid in origin. The most common cause of primary
> hypothyroidism is Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, which is associated with
> circulating antithyroid antibodies and may coexist with diabetes
> mellitus and other diseases in which circulating antibodies are found,
> such as pernicious anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid
> arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome and chronic hepatitis. Another important
> cause is surgical or radioiodine ablation of the gland in the treatment
> of Graves’ disease. It may also occur as a primary idiopathic disorder.
>
> Hypothyroidism can also occur with normal or nearly normal thyroid
> tissue, that can be caused by severe iodine deficiency. Some drugs may
> inhibit organification of thyroidal Iodo, but in most cases the
> hypothyroidism associated with these drugs is mild. The most important
> drugs causing hypothyroidism are: lithium carbonate,
> para-aminosalicyclic acid, amiodarone, sulfonamides and phenylbutazona.
> Chronic therapy with the antithyroid drugs propilthiouracil and
> metimazole will have the same result of the drugs above mentioned.
>
> It may occur during the late phase of subacute thyroiditis, this is
> usually transient, but it is permanent in about 10 per cent of patients.
>
> Screening of newborns for hypothyroidism is now widely practiced, and
> the incidence of this condition is about 1 in 4000 births. About 65 per
> cent of infants with congenital hypothyroidism in North America have
> thyroid agenesis or hypoplasia, 25 per cent have ectopic thyroid glands,
> and about 10 per cent have defects in one of the steps required for
> thyroid hormone synthesis. Placental transfer of TSH-Ab (block) from a
> mother with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, may result in agenesis of the
> thyroid gland. Rare causes of neonatal hypothyroidism include
> administration during pregnancy of iodides, antithyroid drugs, or
> radioactive iodine for thyrotoxicosis.
>
> Secondary and tertiary hypothyroidism occur as a result of pituitary and
> hypothalamic dysfunction respectively and are quite rare and usually
> associated with other symptoms and signs. Another rare cause is tissue
> resistance to thyroid hormones, which is usually due to an abnormality
> in the nuclear receptor for these hormones.
>
> Epidemiology
>
> It is a common disorder in adults. In one epidemiologic survey, 1.4 per
> cent of adult females and about 0.1 per cent of adult males were
> affected.
>
> Pathogenesis
>
> The pathology of the thyroid gland in hypothyroidism depends on the
> etiology of the syndrome. Thyroid deficiency affects every tissue in the
> body so that symptoms are multiple. Pathologically, the most
> characteristic finding is the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in
> interstitial tissues. Accumulation of this hydrophilic substance and
> increased capillary permeability to albumin account for the interstitial
> edema that is particularly evident in the skin, heart muscle and
> striated muscle. The accumulation is not due to increased synthesis but
> to decreased destruction of glycosaminoglycans.
>
> Clinical Manifestations
>
> 1 - Newborn Infants (Cretinism)
> Cretinism may be manifested at birth but usually becomes evident within
> the first several months, depending on the extent of thyroid failure.
> The symptoms of hypothyroidism in newborns include respiratory
> difficulty, cyanosis, persistence of physiologic jaundice, poor feeding,
> hoarse cry, constipation, somnolence, umbilical hernia, and marked
> retardation of bone maturation. In later months, delay in reaching the
> normal milestones of development becomes evident: short stature, coarse
> features with protruding tongue, broad flat nose, widely set eyes,
> sparse hair, dry skin, impaired mental development, retarded bone age
> and delayed dentition.2 - Children
> Characterized by retarded growth, with shortness of stature, and
> evidence of mental retardation. Poor performance at school may call
> attention to the diagnosis. Variable manifestation of adult
> hypothyroidism is present.3 - Adults
> Comon features of hypothyroidism include easy fatigability, coldness,
> weight gain, constipation, menstrual irregularities, and muscle cramps.
> Physical findings include a cool, rough, dry skin, puffy face and hands,
> hair becomes dry and tends to fall, a hoarse, husky voice, and slow
> reflexes. Reduced conversion of carotene to vitamin A and increased
> blood levels of circulating carotene may give the skin a yellowish
> color.A - Cardiovascular Signs
> Impaired muscular contraction, bradycardia, and diminished cardiac
> output. Cardiac enlargement may occur, due in part to interstitial
> edema, nonspecific myofibrillary swelling, and left ventricular
> dilatation but often to pericardial effusion. Although cardiac output is
> reduced, congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema are rarely noted.
> If the heart is small, pituitary hypothyroidism or coincident primary
> adrenal insufficiency (Schimidt’s syndrome) should be considered. There
> is controversy about whether myxedema induces coronary artery disease,
> but coronary artery disease is more common in patients with
> hypothyroidism. Particularly in older patients. In patients with angina
> pectoris, hypothyroidism may protect the heart from ischemic stress, and
> replacement therapy may aggravate the angina.B - Pulmonary Function
> Shallow, slow respiration and impaired respiratory response to
> hypercapnia or hypoxia. Respiratory failure is a major problem in
> patients with myxedema coma.C - Gastrointestinal Tract
> Peristalsis is markedly slowed, resulting in chronic constipation and
> occasionally severe fecal impaction or ileus.D - Hemathologic
>
> Anemia is the major manifestation. There are at least four mechanisms
> that may contribute to the anemia: impaired hemoglobin synthesis, iron
> deficiency from increased iron loss with menorrhagia, as well as
> impaired intestinal absorption or iron, folate deficiency due to
> impaired intestinal absorption of folic acid, and pernicious anemia,
> with vitamin B12 deficiency.
>
>  E - Renal Function
> Decreased glomerular filtration rate and impaired ability to excrete
> water load.
> F - Neuromuscular System
> Severe muscle cramps, paresthesias, and muscle weakness.G - Nervous
> System
> Symptoms may include chronic fatigue, lethargy, and inability to
> concentrate. In the elderly CNS symptoms may be erroneously attributed
> to aging or other disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, depression, or
> Alzheimer’s disease. Carpal tunnel syndrome may occur. If untreated,
> hypothyroidism may pass into a hypothermic, stuporous state (myxedema
> coma) that may be fatal.   (THIS IS WHAT HAPPENED TO ME!)
>
> Hypothyroidism impairs the conversion of peripheral metabolism of
> estrogens precursors to estrogen, resulting in altered FSH and LH
> secreti
>
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